“The results were quite surprising,” said Sassone-Corsi, Donald Bren Professor of Biological Chemistry. “No one realized that the liver or skin could be so directly affected by light.” For example, despite the shutdown of all other body clocks, including the central brain clock, the liver knew what time it was, responded to light changes as day shifted to night and maintained critical functions, such as preparing to digest food at mealtime and converting glucose to energy. Somehow, the liver’s circadian clock was able to detect light, presumably via signals from other organs. Only when the mice were subjected to constant darkness did the liver’s clockRead More →

In short, rash was directly associated with concentrations of ozone and inhalable, fine particulate matter less than 2.5 mcm in diameter (PM 2.5). Joint flares were associated with PM 2.5, ozone, resultant wind, and humidity. Renal flares were inversely associated with temperature, and directly associated with wind and humidity. Pulmonary flares and serositis were associated with PM 2.5, and both hematologic and neurologic flares with wind and temperature. Source: Atmospheric fluctuations tied to lupus flares | MDedge Rheumatology Recommend on Facebook Tweet about it

Paroxetine, also known by the trade names Aropax, Paxil, Pexeva, Seroxat, Sereupin and Brisdelle, was first marketed in the U.S. in 1992. Effective for major depression and various anxiety disorders, it quickly gained a sizable share of the antidepressant prescription market. By the late 1990s, paroxetine frequently was being associated with serious drug interactions and medication side effects. Most significantly, in a major Canadian epidemiological study examining the relationship between antidepressants and diseases, paroxetine was associated with a 620 percent increase in the rate of breast cancer in women who had taken it over a four-year period. Though re-analyses of this investigation discounted the magnitudeRead More →

The team now hypothesizes that under broad-spectrum daylight conditions, these genes would be subsequently deactivated by wavelengths from a different part of the spectrum — but these additional wavelengths may be absent in fluorescent lighting. The skin and brain of the three animals, as well as the liver of both fish models all exhibit, increased inflammation and immune responses; however, the mouse liver suppressed this reaction. Overall, the conserved nature of the genetic responses observed, among fishes and a mammal, suggest the presence of light responsive genetic circuitry that is deeply embedded in the vertebrate genome. Source: Study links fluorescent lighting to inflammation and immuneRead More →

Neuroscientist Sara Lazar found that people who practiced meditation had more gray matter in the part of the brain linked to decision-making and working memory: the frontal cortex. While most people see their cortexes shrink as they age, 50-year-old meditators in the study had the same amount of gray matter as those half their age. Participants in the study averaged about 27 minutes of the habit a day, but other studies suggest that you can see significant positive changes in just 15 minutes a day. Source: 50-year-olds can have the brains of 25-year-olds if they sit quietly and do nothing – Business Insider Recommend onRead More →