“Children constantly learn from their environments, especially their primary relationships,” explains Shanna Donhauser, a family therapist and childhood mental health specialist in Seattle. “Rupture and conflict are inevitable. But repairing those ruptures strengthens relationships and builds the foundation of trust, comfort, and safety.” Donhauser has identified four steps to help parents help their children work through the frightening experience of witnessing a parent’s anger. Source: The Four Steps to Comforting a Child After Mom or Dad Gets Angry | Fatherly Recommend on Facebook Tweet about it

“Our data is showing a lot of kids do want to have this conversation,” said Richard Weissbourd, a Harvard psychologist who co-authored the study of the 18- to 25-year-olds. He said that teachers and parents should be establishing themselves as experts on mature relationships and, in turn, creating an environment in which teens feel comfortable seeking advice about those experiences. Source: How to Teach Teens About Love, Consent and Emotional Intelligence | MindShift | KQED News Recommend on Facebook Tweet about it

If you agree that the symptoms of depression are a logical and understandable response to one set of life circumstances – losing a loved one – might they not be an understandable response to other situations? What about if you lose your job? What if you are stuck in a job that you hate for the next 40 years? What about if you are alone and friendless? ………………………………………………………………………………………………… This led Professor Kirsch to ask a more basic question, one he was surprised to be asking. How do we know depression is even caused by low serotonin at all? When he began to dig, it turnedRead More →

…a parent must dance the child to his tears, to letting go, and to the sense of rest that comes in the wake of letting go…[a parent must] come alongside the child’s experience of frustration and provide comfort. The agenda should not be to teach a lesson but to move frustration to sadness…Much more important than our words is the child’s sense that we are with her, not against her.” – Gordon Neufeld and Gabor Mate, Hold on to Your Kids Source: The Train Analogy That Will Completely Change How You See Your Crying Child – Pick Any Two Recommend on Facebook Tweet about it

If you want to know how someone is feeling, it might be better to close your eyes and use your ears: People tend to read others’ emotions more accurately when they listen and don’t look, according to research published by the American Psychological Association…   Source: Best Way to Recognize Emotions in Others: Listen Recommend on Facebook Tweet about it

“In a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled crossover study of individuals with self-reported non-celiac gluten sensitivity, we found fructans to induce symptoms, measured by the gastrointestinal symptom rating scale irritable bowel syndrome version”   http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0016508517363023 Recommend on Facebook Tweet about it