The revolution is being led by Robert Oliver, a 58-year-old New Zealander who grew up in Fiji and Samoa, where his father was a social worker. “When you look at pictures from the 1970s and early ’80s, they were just wonderfully fit, healthy people,” says Oliver, who is host and executive producer of the program. “The diet was carb-heavy, fish-heavy, veg-heavy. But if you take out the greens and put in processed food and have a sweet drink, then you have a sugar bomb, because the carbs convert to sugar.” Source: Pacific Island Food Revolution: the reality TV show tackling the region’s health crisis RecommendRead More →

Stripped of a lot of what might be called cognitive-science-ese, Mercier and Sperber’s argument runs, more or less, as follows: Humans’ biggest advantage over other species is our ability to coöperate. Coöperation is difficult to establish and almost as difficult to sustain. For any individual, freeloading is always the best course of action. Reason developed not to enable us to solve abstract, logical problems or even to help us draw conclusions from unfamiliar data; rather, it developed to resolve the problems posed by living in collaborative groups. “Reason is an adaptation to the hypersocial niche humans have evolved for themselves,” Mercier and Sperber write. HabitsRead More →

“What we can begin to think about is whether other people’s experiences or stresses may be changing us in a way that we don’t fully understand,” says Bains, professor in the Department of Physiology and Pharmacology. “The study also demonstrates that traits we think of as uniquely human are evolutionary conserved biological traits.” The study shows that the effects of stress on the brain are reversed only in female mice following a social interaction. The team noticed that, in females, the residual effects of stress on neurons were cut almost in half following time spent with unstressed partners. The same was not true for males. “If some of theRead More →

After 4 weeks of kiwifruit consumption, the subjective CPSQI score, waking time after sleep onset, and sleep onset latency were significantly decreased (42.4%, 28.9%, and 35.4%, respectively). Total sleep time and sleep efficiency were significantly increased (13.4% and 5.41%, respectively). Kiwifruit consumption may improve sleep onset, duration, and efficiency in adults with self-reported sleep disturbances. Further investigation of the sleep-promoting properties of kiwifruit may be warranted. Source: Effect of Kiwifruit Consumption on Sleep Quality in Adults With Sleep Problems – PubMed Labs Recommend on Facebook Tweet about it

“A large body of research now suggests that depression is associated with a low-grade, chronic inflammatory response and is accompanied by increased oxidative stress. If depression is primarily caused by inflammation, the obvious question that arises is, “What is causing the inflammation?” Furthermore, what can you do if you’re suffering from depression? Find out more about the depression-inflammation connection below.” -Chris Kresser   Source: Is Depression a Disease—or a Symptom of Inflammation? Recommend on Facebook Tweet about it

Wallace-Wells points out that even though thousands of scientists, perhaps hundreds of thousands, are daily trying to impress on lay readers the urgency of collective action, the religion (his word) of technology creates a belief that, to the extent there is some distant-and-disputed problem, everything will be mysteriously solved by some combination of machine learning and post-Earth survival. We’ll live in spaceships and eat lab-printed meat, and Elon Musk will fix things. I see a parallel in another big news story: the hype and enthusiasm about 5G wireless as the “thing that will make the existing [communications] model obsolete.” 5G is touted as the solution to allRead More →