I have been doing psychotherapy with ex-boarders for 25 years and I am a former boarding-school teacher and boarder. My pioneering study of privileged abandonment always sparks controversy: so embedded in British life is boarding that many struggle to see beyond the elitism and understand its impact. The prevalence of institutionalised abuse is finally emerging to public scrutiny, but the effects of normalised parental neglect are more widespread and much less obvious. Source: Why boarding schools produce bad leaders | Education | The Guardian Recommend on Facebook Tweet about it

“So what should you do if your social life is lacking? Here, too, the research is instructive. To begin with, don’t dismiss the humble acquaintance. Even interacting with people with whom one has weak social ties has a meaningful influence on well-being. [7] Beyond that, building deeper friendships may be largely a matter of putting in time. A recent study out of the University of Kansas found that it takes about 50 hours of socializing to go from acquaintance to casual friend, an additional 40 hours to become a “real” friend, and a total of 200 hours to become a close friend. [8]”   Source:Read More →

YSource: That ‘White Meat Raises Your Cholesterol As Much As Red Meat!’ Study Is A Pile of Chicken $#@% – Fat Head “You don’t develop heart disease because your body makes too much LDL. You develop heart disease because your body makes the wrong kind of LDL. When your coronary arteries become damaged or inflamed, LDL shows up to repair the damage. But if your body is producing LDL that’s small and dense, then those particles can become embedded in your arteries and trigger the formation of a plaque. Here are a couple of quotes from studies on LDL particle size and heart disease: LDLRead More →

Scientists from the University of Nottingham have discovered that drinking a cup of coffee can stimulate ‘brown fat’, the body’s own fat-fighting defenses, which could be the key to tackling obesity and diabetes. Source: Could coffee be the secret to fighting obesity? — ScienceDaily Recommend on Facebook Tweet about it

Ovarian reserve, a term widely adopted to reflect the number of resting follicles in the ovary and thus a marker of potential female fertility, has been found in a large-scale study to be adversely affected by high levels of air pollution. Source: Air pollution found to affect marker of female fertility in real-life study: Decline in ovarian reserve related to particulate matter and nitrogen dioxide in atmosphere — ScienceDaily Recommend on Facebook Tweet about it